Why The Nueco Group Has a Factory in Sheffield



Did you know that Sheffield has more trees per person than any city in Europe?


Yes, the trees outnumber people 4 to 1. This is made possible by over 170 woodlands, 78 public parks and 10 public gardens.


As England’s third largest district authority, the city has a population of about 575,400.


So…

Why Sheffield?

Nicknamed the ‘Steel City’, Sheffield is the heartbeat of UK manufacturing and has an international reputation for steel-making.


Dating back to around the 14th century, the steel industry propelled it as one of England’s main cities in the 18th,19th and 20th centuries.


How was that possible?


A combination of local coal, iron and water power such as River Don and its tributaries enabled Sheffield to prosper. For instance, in 1850, Britain produced about 50,000 tons of steel. About 85 percent of this amount was produced in Sheffield.


As a result, the steel industry led to a massive growth in the city’s population. The residents increased from 60,995 in 1801 to a peak of around 577,050 in 1951.


Today, Sheffield is home to some of the world-leading manufacturing companies such as Pegler Group, Forgemasters, Rolls Royce, Boeing, Primetals Technologies, Outokumpu, Gripple, Tata Steel and Swann Morton.

So What Does All This Mean?

‘Sheffield Steel’ or ‘Made in Sheffield’ is synonymous with high precision engineering and high quality design. Sheffield’s famous steel-making heritage has resulted in a culture of innovation. This is important for the development of a modern and advanced manufacturing economy.


In other words, many enterprises owe a lot to the Sheffield steel industry over the centuries. This, of course, includes us at Nueco as we work with steel and aluminium. It’s how we are able to cope with global competition and the demands of modern manufacturing processes.


All in all, Sheffield is a city full of intelligent minds and exciting ideas. Setting up a factory here was the best way to tap into the undoubted strengths of this rich history.